Cemetery Burial Records

Listed here are links to the Eagle River Genealogical Society Cemetery Records for the:

  • Eagle River Cemetery
  • Saint Peter’s Cemetery
  • Star Lake Cemetery
  • Plum Lake Cemetery

Also included is an article on “COINS LEFT ON CEMETERY HEADSTONES” 

Eagle River Cemetery Records: eagle-river-cemetery-burial-records-31-jan-2017

In the summer of 2015, all Eagle River Cemetery monuments/markers were cleaned, if appropriate,  and then photographed by Max E. Rockafellow, member of the Eagle River Genealogical Society.  Photographs were reviewed and additions and corrections were made to the Initial Cemetery Transcriptions of burials recorded during 2006-2007 by Lorene Hesselgrave Schertzl .  Photographs of mouments/markers were then added to  .  www.findagrave.com for geneagolist to research via the internet.

Note:  When the Eagle River Cemetery Burial Site indicates Potter’s Field (PC-000):  This person is buried in the Potter’s Field area of the Eagle River Cemetery.  Potter’s Field, paupers’ grave or common grave, is a term for a place of burial of unknown or indigent people. The US expression Potter’s Field derives from the Bible, referring to a field used for the extraction of potter’s clay; such land, useless for agriculture, could be used as a burial site.  In the Eagle River Cemetery Potter’s Field graves are full graves marked with a burial lot number etched on a cement marker, 4” in diameter, buried flush with the ground.  Many markers, over time, were covered with soil and overgrown grass.  As of August 2015, all Potter’s Field markers have been located, uncovered and painted red by Max E. Rockafellow, member, Eagle River Genealogical Society.  The Cemetery Sexton encourages relatives to arrange for placement of a monument or marker.  The GPS coordinates, 45.91658 – 89.23495 are for the center of the field.

Master Cemetery Burial Records are maintained and held by the Sexton of the Eagle River Cemetery, Tom Lorch, and Cemetery Board of Directors.

Saint Peter’s Cemetery Records: saint-peters-cemetery-burial-records-31-jan-2017

In the summer of 2015 and 2016, all Saint Peter’s Cemetery monuments/markers were cleaned, if appropriate,  and then photographed by Max E. Rockafellow, member of the Eagle River Genealogical Society.  Photographs were reviewed and additions and corrections were made to the Initial Cemetery Transcriptions of burials recorded during 2006-2007.  Photographs of mouments/markers were then added to http://www.findagrave.com for geneagolist to research via the internet.

Cemetery Master Records are held and maintained by Art Zyhowski,  Sexton, of the Saint Peter’s Catholic Cemetery for the Saint Peter’s Catholic ChurchCemetery

Cemetery Records: star-lake-cemetery-burial-records-01-jan-2017

In the summer of 2015 and 2016, all Star Lake Cemetery monuments/markers were cleaned, if appropriate, and then photographed by Max E. Rockafellow and Fred Rockafellow, members of the Eagle River Genealogical Society.  Photographs were reviewed and additions and corrections were made to the Initial Cemetery Transcriptions of burials recorded during 2006-2007.  Photographs of mouments/markers were then added to http://www.findagrave.com for geneagolist to research via the internet.

Cemetery Master Records are held and maintained by the Sexton, Jim Mortag, of the Star Lake Cemetery.

Plum Lake Cemetery Records: plum-lake-cemetery-burial-records-01-jan-2017

In the summer of 2016, all Plum Lake Cemetery monuments/markers were cleaned, if appropriate,  and then photographed by Max E. Rockafellow and  Fred Rockafellow, members of the Eagle River Genealogical Society.  Photographs were reviewed and additions and corrections were made to the Initial Cemetery Transcriptions of burials recorded during 2006-2007.  Photographs of mouments/markers were then added to http://www.findagrave.com for geneagolist to research via the internet.

The Master Plum Lake Cemetery Burial Records are maintained and held by the Sexton, Jim Mortag, of the Plum Lake Cemetery, aka: Sayner Cemetery

*Disclaimer: These records were created and are maintained by the Eagle River Genealogical Society. They are published as a service for its’ Members, the Community and fellow Genealogists.  Accuracy is not guaranteed.  Independent verification is urged.

© Eagle River Genealgocial Society.

COINS LEFT ON CEMETERY HEADSTONES

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.  These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America’s Military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.  A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the soldier when he was killed.

According to tradition, the coins left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

In the US, this practice became common during the Vietnam war, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier’s family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war.  Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a “down payment” to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited.

The tradition of leaving coins on the headstones of military men and women can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire.

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